:: Home » E-Book » 2004 » Giugno
2004
22
Giu

A Study In Scarlet

Commenti () - Page hits: 2300
Dettagli
Genere: Giallo
Lingua: inglese
Lunghezza: circa 45800 parole (tempo di lettura: 144-208 minuti)
Prezzo: Gratis
Estratto

THE SCIENCE OF DEDUCTION




    WE met next day as he had arranged, and inspected the rooms at No. 221B, Baker Street, of which he had spoken at our meeting. They consisted of a couple of comfortable bed-rooms and a single large airy sitting-room, cheerfully furnished, and illuminated by two broad windows. So desirable in every way were the apartments, and so moderate did the terms seem when divided between us, that the bargain was concluded upon the spot, and we at once entered into possession. That very evening I moved my things round from the hotel, and on the following morning Sherlock Holmes followed me with several boxes and portmanteaus. For a day or two we were busily employed in unpacking and laying out our property to the best advantage. That done, we gradually began to settle down and to accommodate ourselves to our new surroundings.

    Holmes was certainly not a difficult man to live with. He was quiet in his ways, and his habits were regular. It was rare for him to be up after ten at night, and he had invariably breakfasted and gone out before I rose in the morning. Sometimes he spent his day at the chemical laboratory, sometimes in the dissecting-rooms, and occasionally in long walks, which appeared to take him into the lowest portions of the City. Nothing could exceed his energy when the working fit was upon him; but now and again a reaction would seize him, and for days on end he would lie upon the sofa in the sitting-room, hardly uttering a word or moving a muscle from morning to night. On these occasions I have noticed such a dreamy, vacant expression in his eyes, that I might have suspected him of being addicted to the use of some narcotic, had not the temperance and cleanliness of his whole life forbidden such a notion.

    As the weeks went by, my interest in him and my curiosity as to his aims in life, gradually deepened and increased. His very person and appearance were such as to strike the attention of the most casual observer. In height he was rather over six feet, and so excessively lean that he seemed to be considerably taller. His eyes were sharp and piercing, save during those intervals of torpor to which I have alluded; and his thin, hawk-like nose gave his whole expression an air of alertness and decision. His chin, too, had the prominence and squareness which mark the man of determination. His hands were invariably blotted with ink and stained with chemicals, yet he was possessed of extraordinary delicacy of touch, as I frequently had occasion to observe when I watched him manipulating his fragile philosophical instruments.

    The reader may set me down as a hopeless busybody, when I confess how much this man stimulated my curiosity, and how often I endeavoured to break through the reticence which he showed on all that concerned himself. Before pronouncing judgment, however, be it remembered, how objectless was my life, and how little there was to engage my attention. My health forbade me from venturing out unless the weather was exceptionally genial, and I had no friends who would call upon me and break the monotony of my daily existence. Under these circumstances, I eagerly hailed the little mystery which hung around my companion, and spent much of my time in endeavouring to unravel it.

    He was not studying medicine. He had himself, in reply to a question, confirmed Stamford's opinion upon that point. Neither did he appear to have pursued any course of reading which might fit him for a degree in science or any other recognized portal which would give him an entrance into the learned world. Yet his zeal for certain studies was remarkable, and within eccentric limits his knowledge was so extraordinarily ample and minute that his observations have fairly astounded me. Surely no man would work so hard or attain such precise information unless he had some definite end in view. Desultory readers are seldom remarkable for the exactness of their learning. No man burdens his mind with small matters unless he has some very good reason for doing so.

    His ignorance was as remarkable as his knowledge. Of contemporary literature, philosophy and politics he appeared to know next to nothing. Upon my quoting Thomas Carlyle, he inquired in the naivest way who he might be and what he had done. My surprise reached a climax, however, when I found incidentally that he was ignorant of the Copernican Theory and of the composition of the Solar System. That any civilized human being in this nineteenth century should not be aware that the earth travelled round the sun appeared to be to me such an extraordinary fact that I could hardly realize it.

    ''You appear to be astonished,'' he said, smiling at my expression of surprise. ''Now that I do know it I shall do my best to forget it.''

...continua...

Download
e-paperback
271 kb
Contiene testo/immagini
non richiede lettore esterno
leggibile solo su Windows
il file verrà scaricato compresso come .ZIP
162 kb
Contiene testo/immagini
richiede lettore lettore Windows o lettore Java (gratuiti)
leggibile su Windows + (con lettore Java) Mac / Linux...
il file verrà scaricato compresso come .ZIP
e-pub
142 kb
Contiene testo/immagini
richiede lettore (gratuito)
leggibile su Windows / Mac / Linux / WinCE / Palm / Cellulari / iPhone/iPod Touch (con Stanza)...
PalmDOC
127 kb
Contiene solo testo
richiede lettore (gratuito)
leggibile su Windows / Mac / Linux / WinCE / Palm / Cellulari...
il file verrà scaricato compresso come .ZIP
PalmReader
121 kb
Contiene testo/immagini
richiede lettore (gratuito)
leggibile su Palm / WinCE / Windows / Mac
il file verrà scaricato compresso come .ZIP
128 kb
Contiene testo/immagini (hires)
richiede lettore (gratuito)
leggibile su Palm / WinCE / Windows / Mac
il file verrà scaricato compresso come .ZIP
MS Reader
126 kb
Contiene testo/immagini
richiede lettore (gratuito)
leggibile su Windows / WinCE
Adobe PDF
0 kb
Contiene testo/copertina
richiede lettore (gratuito)
leggibile su Windows / Mac / Linux / PocketPC / Palm OS / Symbian OS...
0 kb
Contiene testo/copertina
ottimizzato per Sony Reader
0 kb
Contiene testo/copertina
ottimizzato per iLiad
Per i formati in cui è richiesto un lettore (un programma aggiuntivo che consenta la visualizzazione dell'e-book) nella descrizione sulla destra è fornito anche il link al più comune di questi programmi scaricabili gratuitamente.
 
:: Vota
Vota questo articolo: 1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 5 (1 = scarso - 5 = ottimo)
 
:: Arthur Conan Doyle

Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle was born on May 22, 1859, in Edinburgh, Scotland. The Doyles were a Irish-Catholic family. His father suffered from epilepsy and alcoholism and was eventually institutionalized.
He was mainly brought up in Jesuit boarding schools. During this period Doyle lost his belief in the Roman Catholic faith, but the training of the Jesuits influenced deeply his mental development. He entered the University of Edinburgh in 1881, receiving a medical degree in 1885.
He began writing while still in school in order to earn money, and sold his first story The Mystery of the Sasassa Valley to Chambers' Journal in 1879.
After graduation Doyle opened a medical practice in Southsea, Portsmouth, his practice was ''never very absorbing'', at least at first, and he began writing novels in his spare time.
First story about Sherlock Holmes, A Study in Scarlet, was published in 1887 in 'Beeton Christmas Annual'. The novel introduced the detective and Dr. Watson, his good-natured question-raising friend. Their major opponent was the evil genius Moriarty, the classic villain and a kind of doppelganger of Holmes.
The second Sherlock Holmes story, The sign of the four, in 1890 under encouragement from the American publisher Lippincott. The story collects a colourful group of people together, among them Jonathan Small who has a wooden leg and a dwarf from Tonga islands.
The first Sherlock Holmes short story was published in ''The Strand Magazine'' in 1891.
Doyle was married to Louis Hawkins in 1885, and had two children with her; she was seriously ill eight years later and died in 1900. Doyle married again to Jean Leckie in 1907 and fathered three more children.
Following his first wife's death, when the Boer war started, Doyle sailed for South Africa as a doctor and unofficial diplomat, and eventually wrote a definitive account called The Great Boer War.
When his son died in the First World War, Doyle's lifelong interest in spiritualism developed into
a consuming passion.
After Jean died on the 4th of July 1906, Conan Doyle slipped into a debilitating state of depression which lasted many months.
In 1894 Doyle killed off Sherlock Holmes, in The Final Problem, public outcry was so great that Doyle was forced to explain away Holmes' death and continue his career.
In The hound of Baskervilles (1902) Doyle narrated an early case of dead detective The ingenious murder weapon in the story is an animal. Because of public demand Doyle resurrected his popular hero in The Empty House (1903).
In these following stories Holmes stopped using cocaine, but although Doyle's later works have been criticized, several of them, including The Three Garridebs, The Adventure of the Illustrious Client, and The Veiled Lodger, are highly enjoyable. Sherlock Holmes short stories were collected in five books.
Conan Doyle's other publications include plays, verse, memoirs, short stories, and several historical novels and supernatural and speculative fiction.
Doyle died on July 7, 1930 from heart disease at his home, Windlesham, Sussex.

:: E-Book recenti
 
KULT Virtual Press e KULT Underground sono iniziative amatoriali no-profit - per gli e-book e per gli articoli fare riferimento alla sezione Copyright
Webmaster: Marco Giorgini - e-mail: marco @ kultunderground.org - Per segnalazioni o commenti inviare una e-mail a: info @ kultunderground.org
Questo sito è ospitato su server ONE.COM

pagina generata in 73 millisecondi